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rhade-zapan:

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Kappa (river imp)

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Jorōgumo (lit. “whore spider”)

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Kubire-oni (strangler demon)

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Rokurokubi (long-necked woman)

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Onmoraki (bird demon)

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Nekomata (cat monster)

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Tengu (bird-like demon)

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Tenjō-sagari (ceiling dweller)

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Enma Dai-Ō (King of Hell)

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Kyūbi no kitsune (nine-tailed fox)

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Baku (dream-eating chimera)

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Yūrei (ghost)

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Yamasei (mountain sprite)

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Rashōmon no oni (ogre of Rashōmon Gate)

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Waira (mountain-dwelling chimera)

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Nure-onna (snake woman)

(via signorcasaubon)

Source: rhade-zapan
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signorcasaubon:

Hieronymus Bosch - The Ascent of the Blessed; Palazzo Ducale, Venice, Italy; c.1490 - 1516

(via signorcasaubon)

Source: signorcasaubon
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archaeologychannel:

Did you know that cavemen might have been better artists than modern humans? Researchers at Eotvos University in Hungary looked at cave paintings of cows and elephants and compared them to modern paintings and statues. While the cave paintings might seem simplistic, the ancient artists were significantly better at portraying the walking cycle of four-legged animals than their modern counterparts. Modern artists made errors in portraying things like leg placement almost 60% of the time, whereas prehistoric artists made errors only 43% of the time.
Read the full article here, courtesy of ScienceDaily: http://bit.ly/1t0pTNb

archaeologychannel:

Did you know that cavemen might have been better artists than modern humans? Researchers at Eotvos University in Hungary looked at cave paintings of cows and elephants and compared them to modern paintings and statues. While the cave paintings might seem simplistic, the ancient artists were significantly better at portraying the walking cycle of four-legged animals than their modern counterparts. Modern artists made errors in portraying things like leg placement almost 60% of the time, whereas prehistoric artists made errors only 43% of the time.

Read the full article here, courtesy of ScienceDailyhttp://bit.ly/1t0pTNb

Source: archaeologychannel
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ourtimeorg:

She’s amazing…

Source: ourtimeorg
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alpaca-lyptic:

This one was one of the most poignant to me.

Source: alpaca-lyptic
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History 2.0: Civil War Journals & Historic Letters Go Digital

archaeologicalnews:

Armchair historians with a knack for reading scratchy handwriting can now help the Smithsonian Institution with a giant effort to preserve thousands of historical letters and journals online.

The newly launched Transcription Center invites the public to read and digitally transcribe documents…

Source: archaeologicalnews
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survivingstudy:

The key points of any lists are:

  • Have everything you need to do listed, this will help with time management. 
  • Break down the list, don’t just have it all bunched together that will make it harder to focus on tasks that go well together.
  • Colour coordinate, this allows your brain to visually see what is going on before you read it
  • Write your list where you are going to see it, what is the point in writing a list id you aren’t going to look at it
  • Leave room to add to your list, you may find as you go you remember things you need to do or create new things as you go through so having room to add to it will leave it looking nice and readable
  • Tick things off as you go, that way you can see what you have done and what you have to do still, for me.. it is a massive motivational help too

(via poli-flowers)

Source: mystudysurvival
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jeannepompadour:

Totentanz (Danse Macabre) 1455-58 Germany

Source: jeannepompadour
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